• Common Running Injuries

    Running has become one of the most popular ways to improve and maintain fitness, and to stay in shape. In fact, more than 40 million North Americans run on a regular basis. Although running is a great way to stay active, many runners have to deal with an injury at some point.

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    Dr James McBean, BSc, DC, Chiropractor, discusses runner's pain.
    Dr James McBean, BSc, DC, Chiropractor, discusses runner's pain.
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    Dr. Grant Lum, MD, CCFP, Dip Sports Med, Sports Medicine Physician, discusses IT band syndrome and common treatment options.
    Dr. Grant Lum, MD, CCFP, Dip Sports Med, Sports Medicine Physician, discusses IT band syndrome and common treatment options.
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    Dr Larissa Roux, MD FRCP Dip Sport Med, MPH, PhD, discusses How to Treat Foot and Toe Blisters
    Dr Larissa Roux, MD FRCP Dip Sport Med, MPH, PhD, discusses How to Treat Foot and Toe Blisters
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    Larissa Roux, MD FRCP Dip Sport Med, MPH, PhD, discusses chafing symptoms and treatments.
    Larissa Roux, MD FRCP Dip Sport Med, MPH, PhD, discusses chafing symptoms and treatments.
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    Dr. Beverley Steinhoff, DC, Chiropractor, discusses Plantar Fasciitis Causes & Symptoms
    Dr. Beverley Steinhoff, DC, Chiropractor, discusses Plantar Fasciitis Causes & Symptoms
  • Runner's Knee Pain Symptoms & Treatments

    It’s very common for runners to develop pain which often comes and goes if they’re running, and it becomes more and more persistent as you continue to pursue your running.

    Very often, pain by the knee; pain in the lower legs; could be pain in your backside for want of a better term – these are very typical kinds of things which aren’t relieved by just stretching and strengthening. They need to be assessed.

    Some of the most common running injuries are shin splints, anterior compartment syndrome, [inaudible] bend syndrome, patellofemoral syndrome, a lot of low back pain and stress fractures – these are the most common injuries that people complain about.

    Most runners are familiar with these terms. Well, runners are a curious breed of creature in that they feel that they can continue what they’re doing despite the pain. They’ll run through the pain. This is a very bad idea, and eventually, you will prove to yourself that it’s a very bad idea.

    Typically, the basic treatment at home can be rest, ice, compression for any type of swelling, elevation – that sort of an at-home therapy. But really you want to find out what’s causing this problem.

    A very common cause is a problem within the sacroiliac joints of the pelvis – they’re not articulating properly, they’re not moving through their full range of motion. The chiropractor can use chiropractic manipulation techniques, adjusting those, freeing up the joints, getting them moving. That’s just one example.

    We’re also interested in what’s happened with your feet – whether or not your arches have come down, you’ve over-pronated your feet. And if necessary, we can recommend orthotic devices for your running shoes.

    We can look at your running form and decide – perhaps you’ve become a heel-runner as you get older, and you’re causing a great deal of distress to your body, running a very inefficient way. So chiropractors who are particularly interested in running may be able to give you very good advice on how you can change your running form to run a lot lighter on your feet, more effortlessly, and essentially glide along, causing less trauma to your body. Local Orthopedic Surgeons 

    A very important thing to understand is that where you feel the pain is not necessarily the root cause of your problem. It’s a complex problem, it’s a riddle, and a very good person to solve that riddle, to sort it all out, is a chiropractor. Often seeing a local family physician or a physiotherapist in conjunction with a registered dietitian and athletic therapist is a great option to take control of this condition. Smart Food Now and exercise is also optominal for overall health. 

    Presenter: Dr. James McBean, Chiropractor, Vancouver, BC

    Now Health Network Local Practitioners: Chiropractor

  • What is IT Band Syndrome and What Are the Treatment Options?

    The IT band or iliotibial band is a part of the quadriceps muscle group. It's on the side of the thigh so it starts at the hip and it attaches down at the outside half of the knee.

    It's an area where there's a lot of friction that occurs because that band can be quite tight as it runs over the knee to the point where it attaches.

    The most common group of people that experience IT band injuries would be runners, but we also see these kinds of injuries in people who cycle or do other sports where there's repetitive bending of the knee.

    Typically the treatment for IT band syndrome would include stretching as well as strengthening of the muscles around the knee, around the hip. It might also involve things like looking at the gate, shoes, orthotics, foot structure, these sorts of things because all those things can have an effect on the alignment of the leg which then can lead to excessive forces being applied at that point in the knee.

    If you think you have IT band syndrome or you have other questions, there are a number of different treatment options available to you.

    Video shot in conjunction with http://www.aesmphysiotherapytoronto.ca/

    Presenter: Dr. Grant Lum, Sports Medicine Physician, Toronto, ON

    Local Practitioners: Sports Medicine Physician

  • How to Treat Foot and Toe Blisters

    Blisters are essentially fluid-filled sacs in the superficial layers of skin that result from heat and friction of, say, a shoe – a runner – rubbing up against the skin and causing irritation.

    Blisters can be prevented by staying well hydrated, making sure that you’re wearing well-fitted shoes that are breathable, that have enough room in them to wiggle your toes, but not so much that your heel pops out. Making sure that you have clean, dry socks, and generally comfortable socks and shoes.

    Just before thinking about treatment, one question that you might ask yourself is whether or not you’re wearing the right shoe, whether it fits your foot well, and whether you’ve given it a chance to be broken in.

    In terms of treatment, if you do have a blister, it’s really important to disinfect the area with soap and water, to apply an antibiotic ointment, as well as an adhesive bandage over the site, and make sure that it’s not touching the actual blister but the healthy skin around it.

    It’s also really important not to cut the blister or the skin away, as this can lead to infection, but rather to just let it heal on its own. And to make sure that the bandages are replaced daily, and kept clean. And last, it is really important to look for signs of infection. That is, any increased redness, swelling, pain, pus, or fever that might accompany this blister. Often seeing a local family physician or a physiotherapist in conjunction with a registered dietitian and athletic therapist is a great option to take control of this condition. Smart Food Now and exercise is also optominal for overall health. 

    If you have concerns such as these, or any further questions regarding blisters, please don’t hesitate to contact your local family physician or your shoe specialist.

    Presenter: Dr. Larissa Roux, Sports Medicine Physician, Vancouver, BC

    Now Health Network  Local Practitioners: Orthopedic Surgeon

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