What are Hockey Injuries

ACL strains or tears. Broken collarbone. Concussions. MCL strains or tears. Muscle strains.

Local Physiotherapists

Anneliese Ruggeri

Anneliese Ruggeri

Physiotherapist
Middlebury, CT
Mr. Trevor Kwolek

Mr. Trevor Kwolek

Physiotherapist
Fonthill, ON
Chritine Bridle

Chritine Bridle

FCAMPT, CAFCI
Physiotherapist
St Catherines, ON

Larissa Roux, MD FRCP Dip Sport Med, MPH, PhD, discusses eversion ankle sprains in hockey.

Behnad Honarbakhsh, MPT, BHK, CSCS, CAFCI, D.O.(c), discusses maniscus injuries in hockey.

Herniated Discs in Hockey

Disc injuries are very common, especially in contact sports such as hockey.

And it’s really important for people to realize that disc injuries, when they’re non-traumatic, they don’t happen overnight, so things cook and it’s usually due to severe imbalances in the body where your back’s taking over because areas like your hip and abdominals aren’t doing what they’re supposed to be doing.

And the disc sits between the bones in your vertebrae and it sort of provides a bit of a cushioning for the spine. Now you’ve got your nerves coming out between each segment of your spine, and when the liquid inside that disc comes out is when you get that herniation.

And when it compresses, or presses on the nerve that’s when you get severe, sharp shooting pain that can refer down the leg, and sometimes people have tingling and numbness associated with it.

You have to make sure that you get to a qualified physiotherapist for proper assessment right away because these injuries can be severe enough where we have to get you to the hospital. If the herniation is pressing on the spinal cord, you’re going to have much severe changes and results and sensations in your body.

You have to remember that it’s very important to get to a physiotherapist as quickly as you can so that they can determine the severity of the injury and sure that the predisposing factors are taken care of to have you on the right track to optimal recovery.

Presenter: Mr. Behnad Honarbakhsh, Physiotherapist, Vancouver, BC

Local Practitioners: Physiotherapist

Behnad Honarbakhsh, MPT, BHK, CSCS, CAFCI, D.O.(c), discusses shoulder injuries in hockey.

Kerry Goulet, Founder of Stop Concussions Foundation, discusses What You Need To Know About Concussion

What is a Sports Hernia in Relation to Hockey

A sports hernia is essentially a weakening of the lower abdominal wall – the muscles and the tendons in the area above the groin.

Unlike a typical inlingual hernia that many athletes face, there is no outpouching of the abdomen into the hernia sac, if you will. Rather, it occurs in a place where the abdominal wall is too thin, where the tissue is too thin.

It can be experienced as a pull to the groin, essentially. An athlete who presents with sports hernia often presents with a slow onset of aching, dull pain in the lower abdomen, in the groin. In male athletes into the testicles. This is exacerbated or made worse by bending forward and cutting, as you do in skating.

If an athlete suspects a sports hernia, it’s really important that they seek medical attention. It’s important to rule out any other diagnoses, which may present with similar symptoms. And in terms of therapy, a course of physiotherapy, with stretching and strengthening might be appropriate, as well as the use of compression shorts.

However, in many cases a sports hernia will go on to require surgery. So, a referral to a surgeon may be needed.

Presenter: Dr. Larissa Roux, Sports Medicine Physician, Vancouver, BC

Local Practitioners: Sports Medicine Physician

Behnad Honarbakhsh, MPT, BHK, CSCS, CAFCI, D.O.(c), discusses Herniated Discs in Hockey

Larissa Roux, MD FRCP Dip Sport Med, MPH, PhD, discusses lacerations in hockey.

Hockey & Shoulder Injuries

Shoulder injuries are very common in ice hockey.

And part of the reason is the shoulder joint is a very unstable joint where you’ve got a shallow socket with a big ball sitting in there. Most shoulder injuries happen when there’s a fall and you have your arms stretched out; when you fall with an outstretched arm the shoulder can get dislocated out of the socket.

You can also get a fracture to the head or neck of the humeris. And in hockey especially when you get checked into the boards you can get damage to the collarbone or the AC joint, which is where your shoulder blade and collarbone come together. So usually with ice hockey it’s more of a contact injury.

With shoulder injuries depending on the severity of the injury and the nature of the injury there’s several tools that we can use to help you in your recovery. Sometimes people will need some bracing or splinting in the initial phase while the tissue is trying to heal.

And these specialized braces will also allow people to have range of motion in planes and directions that we want them to, without sort of keeping the joint in a stable, static position where it can stiffen up and lead to other detrimental effects.

Taping is another option that we usually use for a shoulder injuries that help people get through rehab a little bit faster and sort of provide stability and control where needed, as we sort of work through rehab to then sort of wean people off of that.

Now it’s very important to get to a qualified physiotherapist so that they can determine the severity of the injury and whether or not we need to immobilize the shoulder with a sling or a shoulder brace perhaps or whether or not we need to start you off on rehab exercises right away, in terms of strengthening and flexibility to get you back to recovery as optimally as possible.

Presenter: Mr. Behnad Honarbakhsh, Physiotherapist, Vancouver, BC

Local Practitioners: Physiotherapist

Dr. Jeffrey Norden, DDS, discusses Dental Mouthguards in Hockey.

Local Sports Medicine Physican

Dr. Ellen Smith

Dr. Ellen Smith

MD, FACEP
Sports Medicine Physician
Gaithersburg, MD
Dr. Vinay Chopra

Dr. Vinay Chopra

MD
Sports Medicine Physician
Freehold, NJ
Dr. Naresh Rao

Dr. Naresh Rao

Sports Medicine Physician
New York, NY

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