Badminton Injuries

Recent statistics reveal that badminton injuries occur at a rate of roughly 2.9 per 1000 playing hours. This means most committed badminton players will experience injury several times throughout their badminton career. As badminton is not a contact sport, most injuries tend to occur as a result of overuse. The speed and intensity of badminton means that there are a number of rapid and repetitive movements required by the player. Over time, these repeated actions place strain on the tissues and joints, potentially leading to injury.

Local Physiotherapists

Anneliese Ruggeri

Anneliese Ruggeri

Physiotherapist
Middlebury, CT
Mr. Trevor Kwolek

Mr. Trevor Kwolek

Physiotherapist
Fonthill, ON
Chritine Bridle

Chritine Bridle

FCAMPT, CAFCI
Physiotherapist
St Catherines, ON

Carl Petersen Physiotherapist , BPE, BScPT, talks about badminton and golfer’s elbow.

Carl Petersen Physiotherapists , BPE, BScPT, talks about badminton and piriformis syndrome.

Carl Petersen Physiotherapist , BPE, BScPT, talks about badminton and hamstring injury.

Badminton: PRICE Principle

In dealing with injuries on an immediate basis, we usually follow the RICE or the PRICE principle or philosophy.

This includes the P for protection, so protecting the injured joint or protecting the injured muscle. We use R for rest – or modified rest, which is more applicable.

The I is for ice, which we apply on a regular basis for about 15 minutes at a time.

The C is for compression, which puts some pressure around the tissue and minimizes the amount of bleeding into the tissue, which will minimize the scar tissue and adhesions that are forming. Local Physiotherapist

And the E is for elevation which will help to minimize the bleeding in the area as well.

By following the RICE or PRICE philosophy that will help to decrease the severity of the injury by decreasing the amount of bleeding that you’re getting into it and also help protect the injury from further damage.

Presenter: Mr. Carl Petersen, Physiotherapist, Vancouver, BC

Local Practitioners: Physiotherapist

Carl Petersen, BPE, BScPT, talks about badminton and achilles tendonitis.

Carl Petersen, BPE, BScPT, talks about badminton and calf strains.

Golfer's Elbow in Badminton

Golfer’s elbow in badminton is a generic term for pain felt on the medial aspect of the elbow and involves the flexor tendons and muscles of the elbow.

Often what you’ll find is they’ll be pinpoint tender and sore right on the medial epicondial and the forearm flexor muscles running down this side of the arm will as well be very stiff and tight and give pain often times going to the wrist. Initial treatment should involve rice, so applying ice is very, very important; but also if we get rid of some of the tension on the muscles, it helps to decrease the pull on to the tendon attachment.

Using a small ball like this and doing some massage work on it will help to decrease the tension on those muscles and decrease the pull on to the tendon attachment. To help treat golfer’s elbow, I think one of the most important things is to go and see a local physiotherapist. They can help you and give you stretches and strength exercises to overcome this common problem. Local orthopedic Surgeon

If you have questions about golfer’s elbow in badminton, contact your local physiotherapist. Local Orthopedic Surgeon.

Presenter: Mr. Carl Petersen, Physiotherapist, Vancouver, BC

Local Practitioners: Physiotherapist

The Benefits of Sports Psychology

Sports psychology is actually a really important part of people’s recovery from injury. And that’s because it’s not just your body that has gotten wounded, but it’s also your sense of self.

And particularly if you’re used to being physically active, if you’re involved in a sports team, then there are a whole bunch of effects that happen that aren’t really great with injury.

You’ve lost some of your supports, your sense of your self has changed, you’re concerned about letting the team down. There are just a whole bunch of aspects that have to do with your mental state as well as your physical recovery.

Well a sports psychologist can actually can help a person if they’re injured review what happened and just talk about it. Sometimes just talking about what happened, how you felt, what your concerns are, all of these pieces are really useful.

And then additionally there may be some techniques that can help you. For example, there’s good research that having a chance to imagine, to image, to visualize your sport, to visualize your recovery process, can really speed the physical process of recovery as well.

Learning how to calm yourself down when you’re feeling really tense of stressed that’s a skill that’s so useful whether you’re injured or just in everyday life. There are a variety of techniques for learning how to breathe properly, how to manage your stress and all those can really help with injury recovery.

If you’ve had an injury and you’re wanting some assistance on recovering, certainly having the physical and the medical aspect is tremendously important. Also it’s really useful to speak with a psychologist or a sports psychologist so that you can – your entire body can recover and perhaps even thrive, even do better than you had before.

Video in conjunction with http://www.aesmphysiotherapytoronto.ca/

Presenter: Dr. Kate Hays, Psychologist, Toronto, ON

Local Practitioners: Psychologist

Carl Petersen, BPE, BScPT, talks about badminton and clicking wrist.

Local Massage Therapists

Hannah Armstrong

Hannah Armstrong

RMT
Massage Therapist
Ridgeway, ON
Lorne Demoe

Lorne Demoe

RMT, RAc
Massage Therapist
Niagara Falls, ON
Shelly Bautista

Shelly Bautista

RMT
Massage Therapist
Hamilton, ON

Orthopedics Now

Orthopedics Now

QA Chat
Ask us a health question on
diagnosis/treatment options...